Skin Care and the Physiology of the Skin 

Professional Surveyor Boards » General Surveying » Skin Care and the Physiology of the Skin

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clararobert
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Joined: 12/5/2018
Topic  Skin Care and the Physiology of the Skin       Flag »  Reply »
The largest organ of the human body Focus ZX1is the skin. It protects our bodies from the environment, maintains body temperature, excretes waste matter, gives sensory information to the brain and regulates body moisture. We think about our skin more than any other part of our bodies, and we manifest that attention by investing our emotions and about 6 to 20 % of our disposable income into our skin (Lappe, 1996). It is worthy to consider, then, how cosmetic products affect our skin. In this article the psycho-social impact of cosmetics will be examined as well as why cosmetics are deemed necessary. The physiology of skin, how cosmetics affect skin function and the effects of synthetic and natural cosmetic ingredients on the skin will also be considered.

The Psycho-Social Impact of Cosmetics Our society is preoccupied with the "culture of beauty" (Lappe, 1996) which includes the notion that our skin must always look young and appear free from blemish. Our psychological well-being is often closely enmeshed with perceptions of how our skin appears to ourselves and others. We define our self-image to include the visible representation of our skin to others, so as a result, it has become the "primary canvas on which our cultural and personal identity is drawn" (Lappe, 1996). Cosmetic companies set aside concepts of natural beauty so that flaws such as large pores, fine lines and wrinkles are brought to the fore, influencing our spending habits in pursuit of flawless skin.

In the animal kingdom, most male species are endowed with colourful physical attributes so that a less colourful, but wisely camouflaged female mate will be attracted to it. Humans do not have equivalent ornamentation, so women use cosmetics, specifically make-up, to decorate their faces to attract prospective mates.

The Need for Cosmetics A cosmetic is any substance which, when applied, results in a temporary, superficial change (Anctzak, 2001). We use a myriad of cosmetics on our skin, from moisturizers to lipstick. Make-up alters our visual appearance by enhancing our facial features through the artistic application of colour. It can beautify the face and be used to express our sense of self to others. Make-up can hide blemishes, scars, under-eye circles or even out our skin tone. It can boost self-esteem, make us feel more attractive and increase our social acceptability in some social situations. Using make-up can contribute to a well-groomed image, which positively influences our confidence, self-esteem, health and morale.
  Tuesday, March 5, 2019 at 1:34:57 AM

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